Smoke-filled clouds float toward the first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) on July 8, 2016, during the LASIC field campaign on Ascension Island.
Smoke-filled clouds float toward the first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) on July 8, 2016, during the LASIC field campaign on Ascension Island.

Abstracts are now being accepted for a session on the Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) field campaign at the American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting in January 2019 in Phoenix, Arizona.

The session—a part of the 11th Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions—will center on the recent U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) user facility campaign and complementary campaigns around the southeastern Atlantic Ocean, including the NASA ORACLES, U.K. CLARIFY, and French AEROCLO-SA efforts.

LASIC, which ran from June 2016 through October 2017, focused on smoke aerosols (tiny particles in the air) from African biomass fires and their interaction with clouds while moving westward above the Atlantic. Using an ARM Mobile Facility, a portable observatory with sophisticated atmospheric research instruments, LASIC researchers collected data at Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean to study how smoke properties changed after long-range atmospheric transport and how the smoke influenced clouds.

Paquita Zuidema, LASIC principal investigator, encourages scientists supported by the Atmospheric System Research program to submit abstracts for the session. The submission deadline is Wednesday, August 1, 2018. The meeting is scheduled for January 6 to 10, 2019.

“This session will be the first opportunity for scientists from the different campaigns, which share similar goals, to interact and compare and contrast their findings. It should be an exciting session,” says Zuidema, a professor in the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. “Session dates and rooms haven’t been assigned yet and indeed will depend on how many submissions we get.”

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This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research as part of the Atmospheric System Research Program.