Research Highlights

Highlights will be written for high-level accomplishments and published journal articles of ASR research. Each PI should submit one highlight per fiscal year. To send in a research highlight, please use the submittal form.

Retrieving Liquid Cloud Temperature from Three-Channel Microwave Radiometer Measurements
May 10, 2018       
While microwave radiometers have been long used for retrievals of total amount of the cloud liquid water path (LWP) and the integrated water vapor (IWV), estimates of cloud liquid temperature have traditionally required the knowledge of cloud boundaries, which are usually obtained from active remote sensors (e.g., lidars, radars), and vertical profiles of temperature. A [...]

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Using ARM Data Sets to Evaluate Climate Model Cloud Simulations
May 09, 2018       
Due to a scarcity of useful observations to guide model development, Earth system models often miss the mark in predicting tropical clouds and their effects on incoming and outgoing energy in the atmosphere. For most of the past two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a scientific [...]

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Using ARM Cloud Observations to Confront Model Cloud Transitions
Apr 12, 2018       
Low clouds are represented in Earth System Models (ESMs) using parameterizations that are often based on benchmark simulations from high-resolution process models. But how reliable are the cloud properties and processes produced by these models? A new paper explores model cloud and precipitation transitions in a highly variable meteorological environment observed during the U.S. Department [...]

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The Relative Role of Surface Energy Budget on the Warm Surface Air Temperature Bias
Apr 11, 2018       
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory within the Atmospheric, Earth, and Energy Division, along with collaborators from the U.K. Met Office and other modeling centers around the world, organized an international multi-model intercomparison project, name CAUSES (Clouds Above the United States and Errors at the Surface), to identify possible causes for the large warm surface [...]

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Diagnosis of the Summertime Warm Bias in CMIP5 Climate Models at ARM's SGP Site
Apr 09, 2018       
Department of Energy scientists, along with collaborators from the U.K. Met Office, organized an international multi-model intercomparison project, named CAUSES (Clouds Above the United States and Errors at the Surface), to identify possible causes for the large warm surface air temperature bias seen in many weather forecast and climate model simulations over the mid-latitude continent.

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