Three Atmospheric System Research colleagues will be honored this week, January 10 through 14, at the 96th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in New Orleans. One has been elected as a fellow; another will receive the highest honor the society can bestow on a scientist; and one has been acknowledged for outstanding contributions to diversity.

David Bader, AMS Fellow 2016

Dave Bader, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Dave Bader, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

David Bader of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is among 28 AMS members elected in 2016 as fellows in recognition of a lifetime body of work that includes outstanding contributions to advancing atmospheric or related sciences or their applications. During a 30-year career at DOE laboratories and DOE's Office of Science, Bader has served as a research scientist and project manager and is currently LLNL’s Climate Program leader. During more than 20 years as an AMS member, Bader has served on the Applied Climatology Committee, the Board on Data Stewardship and several conference program committees. In 2015, DOE honored him for leading the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project.

Edward Zipser, Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal

Edward Zipser, University of Utah
Edward Zipser, University of Utah

A University of Utah atmospheric sciences professor, Ed Zipser has been awarded the 2016 AMS Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal, a lifetime award for contributions to understanding the structure and behavior of the Earth's atmosphere. Specific recognition is for contributions to tropical meteorology through analysis of observed moist convective systems and for sustained leadership in airborne field programs. During his five-decade career, Zipser has sought to understand why more heavy rain falls in the deep tropics but storms are stronger in the central United States and other mid-latitude regions. In numerous field campaigns, he focused on improving recognition and forecasting of severe storms by discerning the difference between ordinary and truly exceptional events.Jose Fuentes, Charles E. Anderson Award

Jose Fuentes, Pennsylvania State University
Jose Fuentes, Pennsylvania State University

Pennsylvania State University Professor Jose Fuentes has received the AMS Charles E. Anderson Award in recognition of outstanding contributions to promoting diversity in the atmospheric and related sciences, as well as in broader communities through education and community service. Elected an AMS fellow in 2009, he was also elected to a three-year term on the AMS Council, the society’s principal governing body, in 2012. His climate research focuses on atmospheric/air chemistry, the boundary layer and turbulence, earth-atmosphere interactions, and carbon sequestration. During the DOE-sponsored GOAmazon 2014/15 campaign, he focused on deep convection over the Amazon Basin. A long-standing AMS member, he received the Father James B. Macelwane Award in Meteorology in 1986.